It all started out as a side project for cosplaying Astrid (see Halloween sewing), and now these DIY boot covers have become my new favorite thing.

I live in boots in the Fall and Winter. In fact, I eagerly look forward to the 1st day of Boot Season as I refer to it. And though I have a couple pairs of faux fur lined boots, the coldest days always need more layers.

That’s where these DIY boot covers come into play. They fit right over the top of your boots and add an extra layer of warmth between you and snow and ice.

And if your house gets cold, you can pop them over your socks too and enjoy the extra toastiness.

The best part is that they’ll take you under an hour and very little in the way of materials. Make up a pair for yourself, and then make a few for Christmas gifts for friends. Let’s get at it!

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Pinterest image: make your own DIY boot covers

DIY boot covers supplies

  • 1/3 yard faux fur any color
  • chalk or permanent marker
  • ruler
  • 1/2 yard 1″ wide elastic
  • 1 to 1.5 yards of bias tape (packaged, or how to make bias tape)
  • 80/12 universal machine needle
  • 1/8 yard rib knit fabric
  • tape measure, scissors, sewing machine
  • hand needle + thread

Cutting your DIY boot covers

Cutting the faux fur without a mess

First we have to measure. Put on one of your boots as you would wear it. For me boots go on over skinny jeans or fleece leggings.

measuring around boot for DIY boot covers

Next, measure around the widest part of the boot. Add 2″ to that for seam allowances and ease.

To cut the faux fur, first flip it to the wrong side. Draw 2 rectangles with your marker or chalk the width you just measured and 10″ high. So for me, my rectangles measure 18″ x 10″.

Next, slip your scissors between the fur hair and the backing. Cut along the line, cutting through the backing only. Don’t get cute here and cut through the fur too, or it’ll look like a cat attacked your cutting table.

If you cut through the backing only, the fur will easily separate along that cut line. It’s literally magic, and there will only be a few stray hairs.

Cut the bias tape

bias binding

Cut 2 pieces of bias tape the same width as your fur. If you’re making your own bias like I did here, cut 2 pieces 1.5″ wide. Press up one of the long raw edges by 3/8″.

So again, for example, I cut 2 pieces each measuring 18″X 1.5″.

Cutting the elastic and rib knit

We need one more measurement here.

Measure at the top of your boot around your leg only. Subtract 1″ from this measurement.

Cut 2 pieces of rib knit 2.5″ wide x the measurement you just adjusted.

Cut 2 pieces of elastic the same length as the rib knit.

Now we’re ready to sew our way to DIY boot cover glory.

Sew the side seams

Bring the two shorter sides of your faux fur right sides together. Smooth the fur towards the inside so that any hairs aren’t hanging past the edge.

Set your machine for a straight stitch with a 3.0mm length. Sew along the edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance. Finger press open the seam.

Bring the short sides of the bias tape together and stitch with a 2.2mm length straight stitch. Press open this seam.

Sew the rib knit band and elastic

Next, bring the short sides of the rib knit right sides together. Using a narrow zigzag (0.5 width, 2.5 length), stitch down the short side with a 3/8″ seam allowance. Press the seam open, then bring the raw edges together and press the fold.

Next, grab a scrap of any fabric you happen to have. I’m using a piece of lining. Overlap the elastic ends on top of the lining scrap by 1/4″ to form a circle.

Set your machine to your widest zigzag setting with a 1.5mm length. Stitch back and forth over the elastic. The fabric scrap will keep the elastic from getting caught in the feed dogs.

Now cut away the extra lining on the backside of the elastic.

From here, slip the elastic inside the rib knit right along the fold you pressed. Bring the raw edges of the rib knit together. Use a wide zigzag to stitch the edges together. As you’re stitching, stretch the elastic inside the rib knit slightly. Repeat this step for for the second rib knit and elastic. Optionally, you could use a serger for this step.

Add the rib knit to the faux fur

Slip the rib knit/elastic unit inside the top of the faux fur tube. If you’re not sure, the top is the side where the fur is facing downwards.

adding rib knit + elastic to faux fur to make DIY boot covers

Stitch the rib knit to the faux fur with a narrow zigzag (0.5 width, 2.5 length) and a 3/8″ seam allowance. You’ll need to stretch the rib knit slightly to fit inside the faux fur.

The faux fur is not going to fray on you, but if you like, you can finish this seam with a serger.

Repeat for boot cover #2. All we have left is the hem!

Finishing the bottoms with bias tape

If you’re using packaged bias tape, first press one side flat, leaving only only pressed edge.

Bring the unpressed edge of the bias tape tube you sewed earlier to the bottom of the faux fur tube right sides together.

Stitch the bias tape to the faux fur with a 3.0mm straight stitch. Move any faux fur hairs towards the inside as you come to them.

To finish up, fold the bias tape completely to the inside. Using a threaded hand needle, stitch the top pressed edge of the bias tape to the faux fur, sewing through the backing only. Make stitches a little smaller than 1/2″ away from each other, poking the needle through 1-2 threads in the backing and through the bias tape. Knot off the thread to finish.

Finish off your second boot cover the same way with the bias tape.

Dance around your house in your new DIY boot covers and enjoy the extra dash of cozy!!

Who can you make a pair of boot covers for?

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