Today I’m showing you how to make a slip from an old camisole.

I love wearing dresses, but often you come across fabric that doesn’t sit well on its own. Maybe it’s semi-translucent, maybe it’s clingy. When you have fabrics like this, a lining is a great option.

But what if you don’t want to fully line a dress? That’s where the full slip comes in.

Unlike full slips of yesteryear, this one has the benefit of that camisole top. So you can show it off under a wrap style dress or with another low neckline dress. It’ll offer you some modesty, smooth out that skirt, and be comfortable next to your skin.

Did I mention that once you have everything prepped to sew, you can make one of these slips in about 10 minutes? For real!

So find yourself a camisole you have in your closet and let’s jump into the full slip tutorial!

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Supplies for your 10 minute full slip

  • knit camisole that fits you
  • measuring tape
  • pencil
  • ruler
  • knit dress pattern with bodycon style (see ideas below)
  • 1/2 yard cotton/spandex or rayon/spandex jersey
  • matching thread + 75/11 stretch needle

How to make a slip from a knit dress pattern

Let’s talk some patterns that will be a good starting point. We really only need the skirt portion of the dress for this one. A bodycon style is really ideal. If you like a more straight skirt, that will work too.

Here’s some pattern options that’ll work as a base for your full slip.

Once you choose your pattern, it’s time to put everything together.

10 minute full slip tutorial

Get your camisole ready

Put on your camisole. Measure straight down from just above the cami’s finished hem to where you’d like the hem to be for your full slip.

For me, I like my dresses to hit at the top of the knee, and slips and linings 2″ shorter than that. For the cami I’m using today, that means I need to add 11 total inches + 1″ for seam allowance and hem. So 12″ to add to the bottom of the cami.

camisole new side seam

If your cami fits you well as is, go on to the next step. You can also tweak the fitting here. For me, that meant shortening the straps first and also sewing a new side seam line to make the cami more fitted.

The last thing you need to do is cut off the original hem. You could unpick it, but then this won’t be a 10 minute project! From the wrong side cut off the hem just above the stitching.

cutting off camisole hem

Prepping your pattern for your slip

Take your camisole and fold it along the center front line. Align the CF of the cami with your pattern piece from your dress pattern. The armhole of the cami should line up with the armhole seam line on your dress pattern.

Next mark the bottom of the cami onto the pattern. Use your ruler to draw a straight line perpendicular to the CF line.

Draw a dotted line 3/8″ above that line–that’ll be your cutting line for the top of the skirt piece.

Measure down from the line that you drew. Is it the length that you measured earlier? If you’re using a regular dress pattern it will probably be longer. For me, Vogue 1314 has a lining piece, so the length is just right for me. Adjust the hem length by drawing a line if needed.

Cutting the back and front skirt

cutting pieces of full slip

Cut out your front and back pieces from the bottom portion of the skirt.

Rather than trace a whole new pattern from what you marked, you can just fold your pattern on the lines you marked and cut away.

Time to sew your full slip

where to sew side seams on a full slip

Pin your side seams together.

Next, sew the side seams. I’m using a serger here. You can also use your regular sewing machine with 3/8″ seams and a narrow zigzag stitch instead.

After this, press up a hem. Use whatever hem depth you like. I’m using 3/4″.

Next, match the bottom of the cami to the top of the skirt piece, right sides together. Match the side seams, as well as center front and center back. Sew the skirt to the camisole. Again, I’m using my serger, but your sewing machine will do just as well.

full slip hem

Finish the bottom of the skirt with a twin-needle hem or a coverstitch.

full slip

So that is how you can make a full slip in short order. This full slip tutorial is one of those projects where you put on a dress 30 minutes before you go somewhere, realize you need a slip, and still you can waltz out the door on time with your new slip. The camisole base makes for the most comfortable slip and it’s a good way to repurpose camis that may not get much wear.

full slip under wrap dress

Are you a slip wearer?

Check out more easy sewing projects:

Author

Elizabeth is a self-taught sewist with a love for all things DIY and creative. Her friend calls her "The Fabric Manipulator" and she's always looking for ways to squeeze the most out of her sewing time in between caring for her 4 kids and husband.

2 Comments

  1. Lita Jones Reply

    I love your idea of adding a skirt to a camisole and at first glance didn’t really see the seam for the skirt. Great idea.

    If you have leffover knit tricot, consider making panties. I was putting laundry away a couple of days ago and thought I would drop you a line. I have some panties I know are more than 20 years old, they are the ones I made. Some are ready to retire. But the retail ones are less than 5 years old and some of them are near retirment. It takes little fabric and I used t-shirt weight cotton knit for the crotch lining. Also used swimsuit elastic.

  2. susan sweet Reply

    I recently got a great price on some vintage slips and each has lovely lace at the bottom and fit beautifully at the top…..what is the best way to make them into camisoles and essentially move the lace up so it hits the bottom of the camisole at just below my waist……I want to know the best technique to do this……these will be used as camisoles and not blouses but I still want them looking lovely & keep all the lace…..not a great seamstress but would love to try…..

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